Friday I listed members of the South Dakota House who receive federal farm subsidies. My list includes only those farmers listed by name and perhaps misses subsidies to various corporations of which legislators may be a part.

Now here's the list of South Dakota Senators I can find on the Environmental Working Group Farm Subsidy Database as recipients of farm subsidies from 1995 to 2009:

  • Sen. Jason Frerichs (D-1/Wilmot): $20,979
  • Sen. Art Fryslie (R-6/Willow Lake): $242,647
  • Sen. Cooper Garnos (R-21/Presho): $142,606
  • Sen. Jim Hundstad (D-3/Bath): $455,348
  • Sen. Ryan Maher (R-28/Isabel): $950
  • Sen. Eldon Nygaard (R-17/Vermillion): $77,675
  • Sen. J.E. "Jim" Putnam (R-19/Armour): $641
  • Sen. Larry Rhoden (R-29/Union Center): $38,672
  • Sen. Larry Tidemann (R-7/Brookings): $0... but his wife Gail Dobbs Tidemann has received conservation subsidies of $21,223
  • Sen. Mike Vehle (R-20/Mitchell): $106,023

Again it is worth noting that if you added up the subsidies earned by all of the above current Senators and the farm-subsidized reps I listed Friday, you get a half-million more in taxpayer support than the $3.06 million their former colleague Congresswoman Kristi Noem's family alone has received over the same period.

As a state, South Dakota drew $621 million in farm subsidies in 2009. That's 1.62% of our gross state product. Had Uncle Sam cancelled farm subsidies in 2009, our state economy would have grown only 0.5% instead of 2.2%.

Now here's an interesting number: take our 2009 farm subsidy haul, $621 million, and divide that by the number of farms, 31,500. That comes out to $19,729 for each farm in South Dakota. Another way to look at that number: Uncle Sam doled out enough in farm subsidies to South Dakota in 2009 to hire a farm hand to put in 40 hours a week for 50 weeks at $9.86 an hour, better than minimum wage.

Compared to all states, South Dakota enjoyed the second-highest subsidy-per-farm payout, behind only North Dakota, which hauled in $27,571 per farm. Funny, I thought, that a state as Republican as South Dakota is so remarkably dependent on farm subsidies... which got me wondering how that works out nationally. Spreadsheet time! Here's the full state-by-state farm subsidy chart, with a comparison of total subsidies in 2009, subsidies per farm in 2009, and the margin by which each states voters have leaned Republican in the last five Presidential elections:

State 2009 Subsidies 2009 farms subsidy/farm rank GOP margin
North Dakota $882,267,751 32,000 $27,570.87 1 16.484
South Dakota $621,463,573 31,500 $19,729.00 2 11.92
Nebraska $768,489,438 47,200 $16,281.56 3 22.606
Kansas $912,592,688 65,500 $13,932.71 4 16.892
Iowa $1,201,339,706 92,600 $12,973.43 5 -5.11
Montana $380,353,410 29,800 $12,763.54 6 9.668
Illinois $953,838,054 75,800 $12,583.62 7 -15.844
Minnesota $913,965,924 81,000 $11,283.53 8 -8.86
Arkansas $502,444,740 49,100 $10,233.09 9 0.08
Louisiana $301,132,413 30,000 $10,037.75 10 4.824
Mississippi $401,962,617 42,300 $9,502.66 11 12.766
Colorado $315,504,661 36,200 $8,715.60 12 -0.238
Georgia $405,215,009 47,600 $8,512.92 13 6.814
Indiana $506,796,986 61,500 $8,240.60 14 9.398
California $666,519,368 81,500 $8,178.15 15 -14.414
Delaware $19,547,959 2,480 $7,882.24 16 -13.814
Arizona $117,022,603 15,500 $7,549.85 17 4.99
Idaho $192,061,567 25,500 $7,531.83 18 27.018
North Carolina $366,258,481 52,400 $6,989.67 19 6.086
Wisconsin $537,130,351 78,000 $6,886.29 20 -5.838
Washington $259,699,645 39,500 $6,574.67 21 -10.774
Texas $1,533,564,784 247,500 $6,196.22 22 12.872
Vermont $42,435,903 7,000 $6,062.27 23 -21.006
Ohio $440,480,156 74,900 $5,880.91 24 -1.432
Alaska $3,996,791 680 $5,877.63 25 20.946
Maryland $67,252,138 12,800 $5,254.07 26 -16.996
Missouri $561,092,894 108,000 $5,195.30 27 -1.156
Michigan $280,621,903 54,800 $5,120.84 28 -9.12
South Carolina $137,869,091 27,000 $5,106.26 29 11.23
New Mexico $94,926,987 20,500 $4,630.58 30 -6.056
New York $168,756,796 36,600 $4,610.84 31 -22.966
Nevada $12,716,419 3,080 $4,128.71 32 2.004
Wyoming $44,143,982 11,000 $4,013.09 33 26.132
Oklahoma $327,849,362 86,500 $3,790.17 34 20.152
Alabama $178,272,740 48,500 $3,675.73 35 15.162
Oregon $126,841,172 38,600 $3,286.04 36 -7.798
Maine $24,974,702 8,100 $3,083.30 37 -12.136
Kentucky $261,071,709 85,500 $3,053.47 38 9.408
Tennessee $238,532,532 78,700 $3,030.91 39 5.228
Pennsylvania $191,168,776 63,200 $3,024.82 40 -7.04
Florida $142,698,849 47,500 $3,004.19 41 -0.32
Utah $46,707,424 16,600 $2,813.70 42 30.768
Connecticut $13,195,841 4,900 $2,693.03 43 -14.954
Virginia $116,645,437 47,000 $2,481.82 44 3.252
Rhode Island $2,648,727 1,220 $2,171.09 45 -25.708
New Hampshire $8,377,419 4,150 $2,018.66 46 -4.176
Hawaii $12,009,073 7,500 $1,601.21 47 -21.806
Massachusetts $12,172,905 7,700 $1,580.90 48 -26.032
New Jersey $15,783,647 10,300 $1,532.39 49 -11.656
West Virginia $16,906,813 23,200 $728.74 50 0.902
USA $16,349,321,916 2,200,010 $7,431.48 -2.104

Notice that of the ten states drawing the largest subsidies per farm, only three lean Democrat. of the ten states drawing the smallest subsidies per farm, only three lean Republican. Run all the numbers, and you find a positive correlation of 0.305 between amount of farm subsidies per farm and leaning toward the GOP.

Ah, so that explains Kristi Noem.