On Thursday, Attorney General Marty Jackley filed a motion in federal court to dismiss independent gubernatorial candidate Mike Myers's lawsuit against Secretary of State Jason Gant. Myers wants Secretary Gant to put Myers's withdrawn running mate Caitlin Collier with his desired replacement, Lora Hubbel, on the November ballot. Secretary Gant refuses to do so, claiming state law does not authorize such a replacement for independent candidates.

I find that reasoning selective and specious. We could probably identify a number of actions Secretary Gant has taken in the interest of solving problems and helping elections run smoothly that aren't explicitly stated in statute but which make perfect sense.

AG Jackley, alas, is backing Secretary Gant's illogic with more illogic:

The state's lawyers argue that current law allows party-endorsed candidates a chance to replace a nominee through a vote of the party. Without a nominating convention or a party vote on Collier's replacement, allowing Myers to substitute Hubbel would "discard the public's representation in the political process and replace it with the will of one individual" [David Montgomery, "Jackley Wants Judge to Dismiss Mike Myers'[s] Lawsuit," that Sioux Falls paper, 2014.08.08].

Statute doesn't spell out any public representation in the nomination of a lieutenant governor any more than it spells out the process for replacing an independent running mate. Yet where Secretary Gant says the absence of the former binds him to inaction, AG Jackley conjures the former ex nihilo as legal grounds for his defense of Gant.

As I have laid out, discarding the public's representation in the political process happens under Gant and Jackley's interpretation: by maintaining the fiction of Collier's running-mate status on the ballot, Gant denies Myers the chance to select and all voters the chance to directly approve his choice for lieutenant governor. If he would win the election, Myers would be forced to submit Hubbel for confirmation to the Legislature, either house of which could reject the will of the voters. The Attorney General's own argument should compel the Secretary to act in the interest of the voters and truth and print Hubbel's name next to Myers's on the ballot.

Gant himself acknowledges that placing Hubbel on the ballot poses no practical problem:

"Should the judge decide to allow the switch, that will be fine," Gant said. "There's plenty of time" [Montgomery, 2014.08.08].

Gant's predecessor, Chris Nelson, testified to the Legislature in 2009 that the state has no compelling interest in locking in the names of independent candidates before August:

At some point, an independent’s going to challenge that.... Their question to the court is going to be, what is the state’s compelling interest for compelling ... an independent candidate to file so early? ... The state doesn’t need to know who independent candidates are until August, when we begin putting the ballot together [Secretary of State Chris Nelson, Legislative testimony on 2009 HB 1234, February 2009; quoted in David Montgomery, "S.D. Independents Might Have Case for Ballot Leniency," that Sioux Falls paper, 2014.05.06].

Without a compelling reason to keep Myers from replacing his running mate, Gant is denying Myers a right that other party candidates enjoy. Recall that Collier officially withdrew on June 12, and Myers officially announced Hubbel as his second choice on July 8. If either GOP Lieutenant Governor Matt Michels or Democratic running mate Susy Blake had withdrawn and been replaced on that timeframe, Secretary Gant would not have batted an eyelash.

SDCL 12-7-1, which uniquely requires independent gubernatorial candidate to file the names of their running mates before they circulate petitions, and SDCL 12-6-56, which uniquely permits parties to replace withdrawn partisan candidates, work together to restrict access to the ballot for independent candidates without basis in compelling state interest. The 1989 El-Amin v. State Board of Elections of Virginia decision says that sort of discrimination is unconstitutional. The 1980 Anderson v. Firestone decision followed similar reasoning, overruling a similar combination of extra statutory burden on independents and absence of statute making clear a replacement process for independent candidates. In Anderson, a federal court ordered Florida to accept the withdrawal of independent presidential running mate Milton Eisenhower and print on the ballot John Anderson's replacement pick, Patrick Lucey.

Precedent and common sense say Mike Myers should have the same right to replace his running mate as partisan candidates enjoy. Neither Secretary Gant nor Attorney General Jackley has offered a compelling state interest in denying Myers and the voters the opportunity to see Lora Hubbel on the ballot as independent candidate for lieutenant governor.

p.s.: Even if the state prevails in quashing Myers's lawsuit, Secretary Gant still can't print Caitlin Collier's name on the ballot. Collier followed the procedure laid out in SDCL 12-6-55 for candidates to withdraw, and that statute says, "No name so withdrawn shall be printed upon the ballots to be used at such election."