Two weeks ago, South Dakota media eminence gris Doug Lund lobbed a blog blast at Patrick Lalley, content strategist of that Sioux Falls paper. Lund got the impression that, in the paper's November 19 100 Eyes podcast, Lalley showed no feeling toward his numerous colleagues whom Gannett canned in downsizing the paper. Lund also took umbrage at Lalley's claim that broadcasters don't do reporting.

Pat Powers picks up Lund's statement because it gives him a chance to slobber over what he passive-aggressively question-mark-calls a "slappy fight."

Pat Powers does not cite Lund's invitation to an intelligent discussion of the differing demands and merits of print and broadcast journalism, because... well, golly, what does Lund say that would keep Pat from mentioning that?

What Mr. Strategist knows and isn’t saying is that when his two pet reporters need more time for investigative reporting or to read Cory Heidelberger’s blog for ideas, they will have it and all the page space they need.

He also knows that stations like Keloland turn out five newscasts and one web newscast a day... while maintaining the top web site in the state. Reporters, including anchors, are expected to contribute daily packages that tell the story with facts and interviews while fitting it into the newscast time restraints... or going live from the scene when a situation warrants [Doug Lund, "The Only Good Reporter Is [a Sioux Falls Paper] Reporter," KELOLand.com, 2014.11.21].

There's a reason you don't see much original video here. Video is a pain. It takes much more time to rehearse, edit, and publish quality video than it does to pound research into good text. Give me a studio, a couple camera operators, a producer, and a maybe live studio audience (are you listening, KELO?), and I could put together some quality weekly infotainment that would tickle the masses. But that's more resources than I'm going to pull out of my backpack.

Every hour I spend wrestling with video software is an hour I'm not reading the Governor's budget or my EB-5 documents. If my job is to help other people get ideas, I probably do it better cranking out five text posts than I do one video post.

That equation does inform a distinction between the news content in our print media and our broadcast media. We get more news stories and more detail in most news stories in the paper than on TV and radio. But print and broadcast media are changing their content and their business models because of the Internet.