In somewhat better local economic news, Madison's movie theater is reopening next week. Owner Todd Frager shut the West Twin Theater down at the beginning of October to give the place its first real renovation since it opened back in the late 1970s. The main upgrade is to digital projection equipment, but we can hope the renovation has also upgraded the movie house itself, which over four decades had declined to an embarrassing state of disrepair.

Alas, the rechristened Madison Theatre loses the distinction of being a two-screen cineplex. Evidently we're down to a one-screen house... which is fine, because really, how many good movies are out there?Update 2014.11.13 09:32 CST: Mistake on my part! Cinema manager Carol Frager calls me today after hearing some confused stories about this blog post at the Community Center and tells me that her son Todd Frager has not gutted the interior and consolidated screens. The newly rechristened Madison Theatre still has two screens! But during this first reinaugural week, the Madison Theatre will show just one film.

The cinema grandly reopens with a special early showing of The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1 on Thursday, November 20, at 8 p.m. (for seven bucks!).

Note that this community cultural preservation is brought to you by government intervention, in the form of an economic development loan coordinated by the Lake Area Improvement Corporation. LAIC director Julie Gross says the theater renovation "coincides with the mission of the Madison Downtown and Beyond taskforce, which is committed to enhancing the vitality of the Madison area." Emphasis on Beyond, of course, since the Madison Theatre is located one mile west of downtown, at the back of a gravel parking lot, along a state highway with no sidewalks where kids can ride their bicycles.

comment!

The Governor's Office of Economic Development and Madison's Lake Area Improvement Corporation score another coup, bringing Iowa sexy bra manufacturer Best Darn Guns (should a company really force us to swear?) to town:

Best Damn Guns website, http://bdguns.corecommerce.com, screen cap, 2014.11.13

Best Damn Guns website, http://bdguns.corecommerce.com, screen cap, 2014.11.13

In a brilliant example of vertical (or is it horizontal, or cross-your-heart?) integration, the LAIC announces it is also bringing the closely associated Wilt Manufacturing, whose subsidiary Wilt Wire and Fabrication does something with Wire EDM, which is obviously connected to the the supporting industry of making underwires.

Or not. Once I get past the crass and gratuitous disembodiment and oversexualization of the female body, I realize Best Darn Guns makes gun parts. But their advertising makes clear the real psychology behind South Dakota's gun nuttery. Carrying guns and now building local economic development makes us real men and gets us action.

Welcome to South Dakota, Best Darn Guns and Wilt Manufacturing! We look forward to your billboards.

10 comments

Burt Elliott is in trouble. The Brown County Democrat wants to return to the Legislature to serve District 3. Unfortunately, he lives in District 2. Elliott said at a Brown County forum on September 27 that while he has a house in District 2, he has rented an apartment in District 3. Elliott says he made the move for "family issues," but pretty much admits that he has cited this apartment address as his voting residence to get around the fact that Republicans gerrymandered his house address out of District 3, which he served from 2001 through 2008.

Soon-to-be District 5 Representative Lee Schoenbeck is already swinging his leadership bat. The likely Republican House leader has reached across district lines to warn Aberdeen voters that if they elect Democrat Burt Elliot as District 3 representative, he will work to refuse Elliott a seat:

Schoenbeck said that, if Elliott is elected, he could run into trouble with a clause of the state Constitution that reads, “Each house (of the Legislature) shall be the judge of the election returns and qualifications of its own members.”

He said the House might rule that Elliott doesn’t actually live in District 3 [Scott Waltman, "Republicans Question Elliott's Residency," Aberdeen American News, 2014.09.28].

We don't see a lot of candidates from one district telling folks in other districts whom to elect. And to threaten to disenfranchise another district's majority takes grit.

But Schoenbeck can back his grit with law. Back in 2006, my Madison neighbor Jeff Heinemeyer sold his house in Madison and moved out to Lake Madison. Yet he fought to keep the Madison seat he'd won on the Heartland Consumer Power District board by renting an apartment downtown and declaring that flat his voting residence. In November 2008, the South Dakota Supreme Court kicked him off the board, saying renting an apartment while maintaining a house as one's practical primary residence does not satisfy the statutory criteria for voting residence.

Schoenbeck also has the state constitution on his side. Article 9 Section 3 makes each chamber of the Legislature "the judge of the election returns and qualifications of its own members." Schoenbeck and a Republican majority can overturn the popular will of District 3, refuse to seat Elliott, and submit the resulting vacancy to the Governor for filling.

Heinemeyer v. Heartland gives Schoenbeck authority to invoke the Legislature's power to reject an elected representative. Schoenbeck further contends that Elliott may have committed perjury when he signed his voter registration application, which includes the statement, "I actually live at and have no present intention of leaving the above address."

I wonder if Schoenbeck will also declare perjurious South Dakota's numerous RV voters. The Lake County Auditor's office informs me that about 1,700 people have sworn to that same statement of residency 110 East Center in Madison, the physical address of MyDakotaAddress.com. As is the case at similar businesses in Hanson, Minnehaha, and Pennington counties, RVers can rent a mailbox at 110 East Center, register to vote in Lake County, and enjoy the legal benefits of voting residency. They don't "actually live" at 110 East Center, and "actually live" figures prominently in Heinemeyer v. Heartland.

Are the thousands of RVers making South Dakota their paper home all guilty of perjury? I know that Republicans have much more interest in thwarting a Democrat's campaign for Legislature than in disenfranchising thousands of wealthy retirees who enjoy dodging taxes. But the same logic and law that compel Schoenbeck to stand against Elliott's manipulation of his voting residence would seem to apply to the RVers who spend less time in their chosen voting residence than Heinemyer or Elliott.

75 comments
Old postcard showing Masonic Temple before widening of Highway 34.

Old postcard showing Masonic Temple before widening of Highway 34.

One of my true loves has died, and I could not save her.

Gale Pifer reports that DeLon Mork and Randy Schaefer will demolish the old Masonic Temple in the heart of Madison sometime after September 20. They bought it in 2007 for $46,000. They were unable to find a productive use for the building. The city failed to heed lessons from elsewhere to make any offer the way it has to promote development of other downtown property. The building went unrepaired, unmaintained, unsealed, and now is unusable and unsavable. So boom, goodbye.

Interior of Masonic Temple, April 11, 2010.

Interior of Masonic Temple, April 11, 2010.

I suppose I'm as much to blame as anyone. I could have gotten rich as a computer security or health IT consultant or stayed a Republican so I could help Mike Rounds sell EB-5 visas, bought out DeLon and Randy, and been up on a scaffold right now putting new brick on Madison's new community cultural center and business incubator. But no, I fiddled around with low-profit activities like blogging and teaching French and thus never came up with the scratch to put my own money where my mouth is. So boom, goodbye.

Taking the band upstairs: Madison's Only Band rides the telehandler to the Masonic Temple roof for an evening concert, August 5, 2010.

Taking the band upstairs: Madison's Only Band rides the telehandler to the Masonic Temple roof for an evening concert, August 5, 2010.

I shall remember fondly the last great thing that happened on that property: M.O.B. playing rock and roll on the rooftop on a sunny summer evening during the 2010 Miracle Treat Day festivities. For one brief moment, we saw the creative, community-enhancing use to which that property could be put.

We can now only hope that once the wrecking ball clears the slate, some creative thinking will make something better of this central corner than just a bigger stretch of blacktop.

Nature does not forgive architectural wounds like this.

Nature does not forgive architectural wounds like this. Crumbling brick on Masonic Temple exterior, April 2010

South pillar and Masonic emblem, April 2010.

South pillar and Masonic emblem, April 2010.

view out NW window, Masonic Temple, April 2010

My office would have been in the northwest room, looking out at the steps, the pillars, and the center of town...

View SW from Masonic Temple roof, April 2010

...or up on the roof, where I could see all of downtown and dream of the next big thing.

21 comments

The Richard Benda Memorial Apartment Complex holds an open house today in Madison to celebrate the vital role crony capitalism plays in meeting market needs.

Jane Utecht's report on the tax-increment-financed Lake Area Townhomes indicates there is great demand for housing in Madison:

"We have a lot of people call because there is not enough housing in Madison," said Jamie McKinney, manager of the Mills Property office in Madison. Because of this shortage, 15 of the 28 townhouses are already rented, she said, even though only 14 are complete.

McKinney said some calls come from college students, but most of the townhouses are filling with people new to town -- some working at local factories, some at the university, some in health care.

"You hear countless stories of people who commute or turn down job offers" because they can't find housing in the Madison area, said Julie Gross, executive director of the Lake Area Improvement Corporation. "If we want to grow, we need housing [Jane Utecht, "New Townhomes Hosting Open House Wednesday," Madison Daily Leader, 2014.08.26].

Utecht notes that the Lake County Commission just approved another tax increment finance district to support a similar housing development on the east side of town.

Utecht fails to find anyone who can answer this fundamental political and economic question: if these housing units are such a sure sell, if "countless" commuters and job-seekers are aching to come to Madison, why does government have to lift a finger—or in this case, one penny of tax burden—to meet this market need?

14 comments

Madison's new thrift store, now christened the Encore Family Store, is scheduled to open in November. Store organizers have scheduled donation drives to collect merchandise for the store for Aug. 16, Sept. 6 and Sept. 13 from 9 a.m. to noon. On those days, folks can bring the usable contents of their basements and rummage sale leftovers to the empty lot between Lewis and Montgomery's on South Washington.

The thrift store organizers continue to seek financial donations. A fundraising letter sent around town on July 25 says that the project as reached two thirds of its fundraising goal. Last March, organizers reported that the thrift store had raised $400,000 of the projected $650,000 it needed; that was 62%. Climbing from 62% to 67% (assuming the July 25 letter isn't rounding) in four months isn't exactly a torrid fundraising pace.

Inter-Lakes Community Action Partnership will run the thrift store, as it runs similar operations in Howard, Flandreau, and Clark, to generate revenue for its various community service programs, like 60s Plus Dining and rent and utility assistance.

ICAP will need some rent assistance of its own. A flyer distributed with the July 25 letter indicates that the thrift store's operating expenses will include rent. Recall that the landlord, the Madison Community Foundation, acquired the property for free, meaning they have no mortgage to pay off. I suppose someone has to pay the property tax on the lot, and I suppose it doesn't hurt to have one non-profit pay another non-profit to pay the city and county and school district, but I can't imagine the Madison Community Foundation will charge ICAP much more than that.

The thrift store promoters continue to press the fear of federal budget cuts as a reason to support the thrift store and "lessen ICAP's dependence on governmental support." Since that fear of federal budget cuts is generated mostly by the government-crashing politics of Kristi Noem, Mike Rounds, and the GOP, I assume this fear will also motivate everyone supporting the thrift store to vote for Rick Weiland and Corinna Robinson this fall.

In a discussion here in early July, local reader DB, responding sarcastically to comments questioning Madison's commitment to desirable economic development, contended that the thrift store can meet a currently unfilled role in boosting the local economy by recycling otherwise economically valueless goods locally:

Yeah, we have no need for a thrift store. Don't mind the Goodwill Truck shipping thousands of dollars of items out of the city every quarter(it will be in town in the next week), not to mention the overflowing bins located on main, near Nicky's, and near El Vaquero. Let's just keep letting that slip away while someone will fully fund a venture by taking worthless taxpayer assets and turning it into something good. It's a need that can't be filled by one of the many consignment shops in town [DB, comment, Madville Times, 2014.07.09].

I have mixed feelings about that comment. On the one hand, I appreciate the notion of increased recycling and local self-sufficiency. But don't we already meet that need with rummage sales? And should we really let ourselves get into the mindset of thinking of donations to Goodwill and other state and national non-profits as losses to our community? If we must think in economic bottom-line terms, we could argue that the system of rummage sales and current donation exports is more efficient for the local economy. At rummage sales, the owners set up a few tables in their garages and yards for a day or two. The free market quickly sorts the usable treasures from the junk no one wants. The owners strike their tables, leaving no sale infrastructure or overhead. They dump the remaining items in the donation bins, which are emptied by out-of-town interests, leaving Madison with no lingering useless inventory—and remember, from a strict economic perspective, static inventory is a cost.

The thrift store will shift that inventory from basements and closets to a new downtown store. It will shift some of the economic benefit from individual rummage sale profits to a few ongoing salaries and support for charity. But the thrift store will establish new ongoing overhead, and it will reduce the economic benefit of outside agencies removing our junk at no local cost.

Of course, these costs and benefits are all pretty marginal. Remember, Madison is spending $650,000 to turn an empty lot into a secondhand store, a venue with slightly more draw but the same basic mission as the city recycling station on Southwest 7th.

Send your cash contributions for the Encore Family Store to the Madison Community Foundation, 820 N. Washington Ave., Madison, SD 57042

11 comments

Chuck Clement finds a couple of honyockers preaching on the bypass in Madison. The basic gist of their bad theology: remarried divorcees are adulterers, women should shut up, and salvation depends on your action, not God's:

Two men who are working in South Dakota this summer paid a proselytizing visit to Madison on Tuesday. Wilbur Graybill and Ryan Luedeker, both Missouri residents, held signs displaying a few of the tenets held by the Church of Monett, a religious institution located in a southwestern Missouri community.

Holding one white placard with black lettering that announced "To be married to the divorced is adultery," Graybill said the sayings displayed on the hand-held sign followed Jesus Christ's teachings from the Sermon on the Mount. Other sayings on Graybill's signs included "True Christians don't use guns or lawyers against evil," "Christian women are meek, quiet and modestly dressed" and "You must change for Christ to accept you" [Chuck Clement, "Missouri Men Preach Along SD-34 Bypass," Madison Daily Leader, 2014.07.09].

I invite Deb Geelsdottir, about whose clothing I cannot pass judgment but who has struck me in the comment section as anything but meek and quiet, to offer a Lutheran explanation of the mechanism by which Christ "accepts" us. I also invite readers to share the Scripture where the Lord says, "Don't ever hire an attorney."

I also recommend these men be careful which Madison women they call un-Christian for not being meek and quiet... and I warn them to say no such thing to my daughter, whom my wife and I will continue to teach to resist such patriarchal oppression. They might also want to watch out for my Christian friends who've married fine people who happened to have bad marriages before who raise good kids and uphold Christian principles.

The Missouri preachers make a fair point that signs are an easy way to get attention and reach lots of people. But I hope they complement their public display with a willingness to engage in honest conversation face to face with the sinners whom they condemn... assuming they are willing to even entertain a conversation with a woman who disagrees with their preaching.

129 comments

I've heard this bit of Madison lore in a couple of permutations. Back in the 1960s, a contractor on a new project was planning to pay his workers wages higher than the local going rate. One of the city fathers (has Madison ever had a "city mother", a powerful woman going around and laying down the law?) went to the contractor and told him he couldn't do that. Pay your workers more, said the concerned civic leader, and everybody else will have to pay their workers more to compete. And heaven knows Madison doesn't want competition.

This story jumps to mind as I read Aaron Renn, who asks whether cities really want economic development and the change inherent in growth:

economic struggle can be a cultural unifier in a community that people tacitly want to hold onto in order to preserve civic cohesion.

Jane Jacobs took it even further. As she noted in The Economy of Cities, “Economic development, whenever and wherever it occurs, is profoundly subversive of the status quo.” And it isn’t hard to figure out that even in cities and states with serious problems, many people inside the system are benefiting from the status quo.

They have political power, an inside track on government contracts, a nice gig at a civic organization or nonprofit, and so on. All of these people, who are disproportionately in the power broker class of most places, potentially stand to lose if economic decline is reversed. That’s not to say they are evil, but they all have an interest to protect [Aaron Renn, "Do Cities Really Want Economic Development?Governing, July 2014].

Replace cities with South Dakota (o.k., and do with does and want with wants). Does South Dakota really want a huge class of well-paid workers who are not bound by local history or state assistance? Does South Dakota really want to invite a creative class that might revitalize local economies but would also include a bunch of people who don't look or pray or vote the way everyone else does? Does South Dakota really want to build an education system that guides students to become something other than cogs in a managerial machine and an economy that invites those independent thinkers to stay and thrive?

It seems nuts that a community of any size would throttle economic development and hold back its own general welfare. But combine concentrated power with an identity built on struggle (oh, life on the prairie is so hard, we're just barely hanging on, just like our homesteading ancestors...), and you can get a community that chooses a plodding status quo over dynamic growth.

17 comments

Recent Comments

  • JeniW on "Rapid City Police De...": I can believe that race relations are not good, ju...
  • Deb Geelsdottir on "Alaska and Tennessee...": Seth Meyers made fun of the Jerk and Drive thing o...
  • Les on "Rapid City Police De...": Two policemen dead out of the three on the scene a...
  • jerry on "Hey, Mike Rounds! Li...": I would bet that the equipment at the Gordon plant...
  • Bill Dithmer on "Hey, Mike Rounds! Li...": That packing plant was just across the border in G...
  • jerry on "Rapid City Police De...": So the streets of Rapid City or Mitchell are now a...
  • Les on "Rapid City Police De...": You spoke of leaving blood on the battleground of ...
  • Taunia on "Rapid City Police De...": Robert Reich, by way of Cory, is saying the class ...
  • Roger Cornelius on "Rapid City Police De...": Will this be the last year of LNI in Rapid City? ...
  • Owen on "Hey, Mike Rounds! Li...": Rounds will do as he's told to do....

Support Your Local Blogger!

  • Click the Tip Jar to send your donation to the Madville Times via PayPal, and support local alternative news and commentary!

Hot off the Press

South Dakota Political Blogs

Greater SD Blogosphere

Visit These Sponsors

Conversation and Lunch with Democrats!
Join Stan Adelstein's conversation about South Dakota's past and future

SD Mostly Political Blogroll

South Dakota Media

Madville Monthly

Meta