Larry Kurtz gets me reading this Wallet Hub ranking of the fairness of state tax systems. Wallet Hub asked 1,050 Americans to say what percentage (between 0 and 25) of income households in ten income brackets ought to pay in state and local taxes. Americans are progressive taxers: the ideal fair tax rates bubbling up from this survey rise from 2.5% for households making $5,000 a year to 16.36% for households making $2.5 million a year.

Wallet Hub then lined these survey figures up with actual state and local tax burdens calculated by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy for each state's five income quintiles. From these calculations, Wallet Hub offers this tax fairness map:

WalletHub

 

Montana comes out with the state and local tax system imposing burdens closest to the ideal rates found in Wallet Hub's survey. South Dakota, ranking 36th nationwide, has the least fair tax system in the region:

State Tax Fairness Rank Rank among Liberals Rank among Conservatives
Montana 1 1 1
Minnesota 7 6 11
North Dakota 15 16 10
Nebraska 23 24 26
Iowa 25 21 27
Wyoming 28 34 22
South Dakota 36 37 31

Wallet Hub breaks respondents by general ideology and finds conservatives and liberals give different ideal tax rates. Conservatives advocate higher tax rates than liberals for the lowest three income categories Wallet hub asked about and lower rates for the upper seven. But conservatives still favor consistently progressive tax rates. Conservatives and liberals rank Montana as the fairest state; conservatives and liberals alike place South Dakota in the bottom half for tax fairness.

5 comments

...But Is Banking Commission Already on That Case?

The Brown County Commission today voted 4–1 in favor of a resolution brought by Commissioner Tom Fischbach to ask the State Banking Commission to determine whether GOED/NBP/EB-5 scandal figure Joop Bollen evaded bank franchise tax. Bollen managed loans and mortgages through his corporation SDRC Inc. but never got a lending license. If SDRC Inc.'s lending operations are subject to South Dakota's bank income tax, Bollen could owe the state $2.4 million in back taxes, $1.76 million of which, according to Fischbach's resolution, could go to Brown County. That would patch a lot of potholes between Hecla and Groton.

One commissioner, Mike Wiese, opposed the resolution. He doesn't oppose the idea of investigating Joop Bollen. But in the most important paragraph of Scott Waltman's report, Wiese says he thinks the state is already conducting that investigation:

Commissioner Mike Wiese voted against the resolution. After contacting the state Department of Revenue and state Department of Labor and Regulation, Wiese says he believes the issue is already being looked into and taken seriously. He said he wants Brown County to collect the bank franchise tax if the determination is it should have been paid. However, a resolution from the county commission will not carry much sway, according to Wiese [Scott Waltman, "County Commissioners Ask State to Look into EB-5 Taxes," Aberdeen American News, 2014.09.09].

A GOED/NBP/EB-5 issue "being looked into and taken seriously" by the state.* How rarely we hear such words, and how gratefully we hear them... "we" being all of us South Dakotans not being paid to make excuses for Mike Rounds.

*Update 18:03 CDT: Ben Dunsmoor confirms that the state is on the case:

The South Dakota Director of Banking, Brett Afdahl, confirmed Tuesday afternoon that he has already sent a letter to SDRC Inc. requesting information. Afdahl says it can take up to 30 days for a response from the company and then follow up questions will be asked before a final determination about the company’s status is made [Ben Dunsmoor, "Brown Co. Commissioners Ask If SDRC Inc. Is Bank," KELOLand.com, 2014.09.09].

*   *   *

Rep. Kathy Tyler did not include that $2.4 million in the $140-plus million she calculates Bollen may have defrauded from the state by other means. The bank franchise tax hangs on an entirely separate statutory peg.

But that $2.4 million in tax evasion could have political implications equal to those we can derive from Rep. Tyler's argument. Recall that when it came to the EB-5 activities that the Governor's Office of Economic Development conducted to benefit Governor Mike Rounds's pet project, Northern Beef Packers, the Rounds Administration demonstrated a keen awareness of banking regulations. In 2010, when Northern Beef Packers arranged a $30 million bridge loan from the mysterious Asian bank Epoch Star Limited to tide it over until a new round of EB-5 investors wrote checks, the Rounds Administration sent GOED chief and EB-5 cognoscente Richard Benda to assure the Banking Commission that Epoch Star was not a bank, did not need a lending license, and did not have to pay bank franchise tax.

The Rounds Administration looked at a one-off offshore funding trick and said, "Jeepers, we'd better get a ruling from the Banking Commission!" The Rounds Administration then looked at its man Joop Bollen, who'd been constructing a fistful of loan funds from EB-5 dollars to supplant local commercial lending, and said... nothing.

Could the Rounds Administration not smell its own shtuff? Or were they so committed to shielding Joop Bollen and his profits that they couldn't risk the scrutiny of the Banking Commission... even if that meant stiffing Brown County $1.76 million?

16 comments

Word of the day: Capone!

Remember how last November I mentioned that EB-5/Northern Beef Packers scandal fulcrum Joop Bollen might have broken the law by lending money without a license and not paying bank franchise tax? I elaborated on that tax-evasion thesis last week.

And now Brown County Commissioner Tom Fischbach thinks there might be some there there:

Tom Fischbach wants his fellow Brown County commissioners to consider a resolution that might allow the county to collect $1.76 million in bank franchise taxes.

...SDRC Inc. doesn’t have a money lending license to legally make loans and does not pay the bank franchise fees, according to the resolution.

In that vein, the resolution said, SDRC Inc. “may have defrauded South Dakota of $2.4 million in bank franchise tax avoidance with a $480,000 ongoing annual tax avoidance.”

The bulk of the overall total would be owed to Brown County, according to the resolution [Scott Waltman, "Fischbach Calls for SDRC Investigation," Aberdeen American News, 2014.09.03].

Fischbach says he isn't sure whether SDRC Inc. qualifies as a bank, but his resolution asks the South Dakota Banking Commission to figure that out for us. Fischbach sprang the resolution on his fellow commissioners unannounced yesterday, so commissioners told him to keep his pants on until next week's meeting.

Did Joop Bollen run a bank without a license? Did Joop Bollen evade bank franchise tax? Those questions aren't just academic or blogospheric scandal-mongering. Those questions can tell us whether Joop Bollen, acting under the authority of Governor Mike Rounds and Governor Dennis Daugaard, cheated Brown County and South Dakota out of another couple million dollars.

I think those questions are worth answering. So does Commissioner Fischbach.

21 comments

Todd Epp of Northern Plains News finds an interesting report from the Tax Foundation stating that South Dakota is the fifth-best state for stretching a dollar:

Tax Foundation, price parity

(click to embiggen!)

Only Mississippi, Arkansas, Missouri, and Alabama can make a dollar go further. Dollars shrink the most in the District of Columbia, Hawaii, New York, New Jersey, and California.

The Tax Foundation used these same data earlier this year to calculate that South Dakotans have the fourth-highest adjusted per capita disposable income in the U.S. (which per-capita figure does not take into account concentration of wealth at the top).

Take these data at face value, and we run into a policy implication that might alarm South Dakotans: to ensure the same desired economic and social outcomes across all states, South Dakotans should pay more in federal taxes and receive less in social assistance. Consider the federal child tax credit: leaving $1,000 in a South Dakotan's pocket provides significantly more help than leaving the same amount in a New Yorker's pocket. To enable the New Yorker to buy as many diapers and boxes of Cheerios as the South Dakotan, the IRS should allow the New Yorker a child tax credit of $1,154 and the South Dakotan $882. Maybe New Yorkers should start a riot over that IRS unfairness.

But notice that the Tax Foundation's read of dollar-stretchability doesn't square with other data we've looked at this year. The ACCRA cost of living index for South Dakota in 2014 Q1 was 98.3% of the national average, suggesting we South Dakotans only get $1.73 stretch out of every hundred dollars. Adjust our median wage (ah, there we start capturing some sense of wealth concentration) by cost of living, and South Dakota is at a regional low for purchasing power. So are adjusted teacher salaries. Even when we look at adjusted average wages, South Dakota families can get by on one average full-time income in only 13 of our 66 counties.

Dollars do stretch in South Dakota, but we need the state and employers to shake more dollars loose so workers can enjoy those bargains.

2 comments

Remember how they nailed Al Capone?

One of the trickiest parts the EB-5/Northern Beef Packers/Governor's Office of Economic Development scandal is figuring out whether anyone broke the law. We've gotten mixed signals from the Governor and the Attorney General about Richard Benda's culpability, but since Benda is dead, we'll never get a verdict on whether he committed any outright crimes. Who's left to perp walk, and for what?

How about Joop Bollen, for tax evasion?

Joop Bollen's private company, SDRC Inc., makes loans and mortgages through subsidiary paper corporations. SDRC Inc. took $550,000 from Northern Beef Packers to pay Richard Benda monitor SDRC Inc's loans to Northern Beef Packers. As I reported last November, one would think this activity would make SDRC Inc. a bank.

SDRC Inc's lawyer Jeff Sveen thinks so. In a May 11, 2011 letter pertaining to litigation in California, Sveen says pretty much what I'm saying, that SDRC Inc., like a bank, lends money:

SDIBI is primarily involved in export promotions and facilitating direct investment for the State of South Dakota. It involves many components, including seminars and workshops, export finance, international trade resources, assisting companies with the South Dakota Foreign Trade Zone, Trade Lead Generators, and South Dakota Exporter's Directory.... It promotes economic development in South Dakota. EB-5 is just one component of the foreign direct investment activities offered by SDIBI. Under that EB-5 component, only equity projects are promoted. In contrast, SDRC, Inc. is completely different in its functions. It is not a facilitator in any equity programs. SDRC, Inc. does not promote economic development, but simply obtains funding through EB-5 and functions similar to a bank by lending those same funds to projects in South Dakota" [Jeffrey T. Sveen, letter to Jennifer S. Elkayam, 2011.05.11].

SDRC Inc. lends money, like a bank, says SDRC Inc's lawyer.

Why does this matter? Because South Dakota imposes an income tax on banks. We call it the bank franchise tax. If you make money lending money—and SDRC Inc. did—then you pay taxes on that money to South Dakota—and SDRC Inc. did not.

Look at the list of money lender licenses issued by the South Dakota Banking Commission. The economic development corporations in Aberdeen, Huron, Webster, and Eureka have had to get lending licenses. The Lutheran Church Missouri Synod had to get one for who knows what. But SDRC Inc. doesn't have a money lender license.

Now lending money without a license is only a misdemeanor. But not paying bank franchise tax to the state... that will hit players in the pocketbook. If SDRC has avoided getting a lender license, it has likely avoided paying the 6% on its net income required by the bank franchise tax. It's hard to know how much Bollen, Sveen, Benda, and friends have skimmed from the millions in EB-5 investment, but if they're loans, they owe South Dakota some bank franchise tax, plus penalties and interest.

So if Bollen and Sveen and Mike Rounds and Dennis Daugaard will appear before the Legislature's Government Operations and Audit Committee on September 24, or heck, maybe at Friday's State Fair debates, we should open with these questions:

  1. Was Joop Bollen running a bank?
  2. Did Joop Bollen license his bank?
  3. Did Joop Bollen pay bank franchise taxes?
  4. On #3, if not, why not, and when will he?

Richard Benda is dead. Saying we would have arrested him or fired him is unprovable hindsight fall-guyism. We have Joop Bollen right there, sitting in his nice house in Aberdeen, quite possibly still collecting interest on loans floated to EB-5-backed enterprises and sitting on money that lawfully belongsto the State of South Dakota.

Attorney General Jackley, Governor Daugaard, are going to collect that bank franchise tax? Or are we o.k. with tax evasion?

Update 09:32 CDT:P&R says he'd get rid of EB-5 even if there were no illegal or unethical activities in South Dakota's exploitation of that program. But the point here is that there may well be illegal activities. That's what makes the EB-5/Northern Beef Packers/GOED/Benda/Bollen story so complicated: we have at least two levels of critique, with bad actors abusing bad policy.

30 comments

When Charlie Hoffman and I got done riding four-wheeler around the prairie (and have I mentioned how big I smile when I say that phrase?), we went inside to talk politics. And oh, did we talk.

Rep. Charlie Hoffman (R-23/Eureka) discusses Pierre politics at his dining room table. (Photo by CAH, 2014.08.19)

Rep. Charlie Hoffman (R-23/Eureka) discusses Pierre politics at his dining room table. (Photo by CAH, 2014.08.19)

Charlie Hoffman has served three terms as a Republican Representative from District 23. He sat out this year's election, leaving incumbent Rep. Justin Cronin and new-Pierre-comer Michele (one L, just like Bachmann) Harrison to win the GOP primary and ascend without challenge to the State House.

Hoffman is yielding the House floor this year for a handful of personal reasons. He'd like to travel more with his wife, Survivor survivor and motivational speaker Holly Hoffman. Some business matters require his attention back at the ranch. And he has a new hunting dog that he wants to train and bond with properly.

But Hoffman makes his stepback sound like a break, not retirement. He's already looked ahead and seen 2016 as a good opportunity to get back into the House. Rep. Cronin will be termed out, leaving an open seat Charlie can seek without challenging a fellow Republican incumbent.

Hoffman's break appears to have some political motivation right alongside the personal. Hoffman expresses a notable disgust for several aspects of how things are running in Pierre right now. And he said these things to me, a liberal blogger, without the influence of scotch. "I'm a haystacker at heart," said Hoffman, "not a statesman, not a diplomat."

I should check that: did he say haystacker or haymaker? Here they come:

Self-Servers and Legislative Autonomy

Hoffman sees coming a tussle for majority leader in which he does not want to partake. He cites a Janklovian aphorism: "In every class of twenty-some new legislators, fifteen know they'll be governor someday." Hoffman says lots of legislators are serving their political ambitions and trying to put their names (Hoffman offers none) on the marquee. Hoffman would prefer to serve with and be one of the legislators who come to Pierre to serve their districts.

Hoffman says those marquee-seeking legislators create a major problem for the legislative branch. As majority whip, Hoffman says he has seen the Governor happily exploit those self-servers to encroach on the Legislature's proper autonomy. The night before each Legislative workweek begins, Hoffman says the Governor hosts a meeting for all of the GOP House and Senate leaders at the Governor's mansion (read: homefield advantage). The Governor's entire staff attends. The "conversation," says Hoffman, flows mostly one way, as the Governor informs the "leaders" of his plans and priorities for the week. The Governor does not inquire, says Hoffman, about the legislators' plans and priorities. And the GOP leaders, mostly concerned about their place in line, generally accept their weekly marching orders.

Hoffman says this one-way relationship is not how the balance of powers is supposed to work. The Legislature should act independently to bring forth different ideas and allow the best policies to rise via competition. One branch dictating the policy agenda means poorer policy. (What was that Charlie said about pastures with only one kind of grass?) Hoffman wants the climbers to quit climbing and recapture their autonomy and vision. Short of that, Hoffman wishes he could have the opportunity to serve under a Democratic Governor who would rekindle his comrades' commitment to the separation of powers.

(The weird subtext here: we could encourage Republican Charlie Hoffman to run for Legislature in 2016 by electing his Democratic House-mate Susan Wismer Governor this year. Charlie, want to help?)

Harmful Partisanship

Hoffman also expresses annoyance with partisan politics. He says the South Dakota GOP has damaged itself and its candidates by allowing Tea Party agitators to pull the party further right. Local radicals may have gotten a kick out of the SDGOP's impeach-Obama resolution, but recall that such absurd radicalism has boosted Democratic fundraising. Hoffman looks beyond our borders to add that such honyockerism may damage the chances of the national party choosing John Thune for Vice-President in 2016.

Partisanship can damage policy along with party. Hoffman says that, without Medicaid expansion, county governments face higher indigent-care costs, and hospitals either eat losses or pass them on to the rest of us. Expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act would erase those costs, says Hoffman. Permit me to remind you that, as Rep. Wismer said Wednesday, the only reason Governor Daugaard seems to have for not expanding Medicaid is partisan ideology.

Future Plans: Raise Teacher Pay!

If circumstances draw Hoffman back to the House, he says he may spend his entire term working on one project: raising teacher pay. He suggests starting by diverting 10% of all gambling revenue (that cut would be over $10 million) to a teacher-pay trust fund. When the fund accrues enough interest, start writing checks, once a year, to every public K-12 teacher in South Dakota.

Our quick calculations suggest this plan might initially place just $500 extra in each teacher's pocket, only a small step toward beating lowly Mississippi, but one must start somewhere. And Hoffman agrees that raising pay will boost the labor pool and ease the teacher shortage.

But wait: gambling revenues currently support property tax relief. Would Hoffman really support taking away that relief? Yes. Instead of handing out pennies per acre, the state could hand that 10% of gambling revenues to the state Investment Council to generate a far larger return.

Agricultural Productivity Tax

If landowners feel harmed by the reduction of gambling-revenue tax relief, Hoffman will make it up to them by getting rid of the agriculture productivity tax. Hoffman says this bastardization of the property tax is even worse than a straight income tax. This tax, which based on the predicted agricultural production value of land instead of its actual productivity or sale price, deters farmers from raising prairie grass and drives hyper-production of only a few high-priced crops. Farmers who switch from corn and beans to grass this year will still pay tax based on what they could have made raising corn for the next eight years. Even farmers who stick with corn will suffer as corn prices drop: they'll makes three to four dollars per bushel this year, but the county will tax them for the next couple years as if their land were seven- or eight-dollar-a-bushel corn. Hoffman says the Legislature needs to change the productivity tax to something fairer.

*   *   *

I asked Hoffman if he worried that my reporting the above comments might harm his chances of returning to the House. He paused to think, but pretty quickly said nope. If I'm reading him right (and stop me if you think I'm letting my hopes and the joy of riding four-wheeler all afternoon confound my judgment), Hoffman is professing a commitment to a less partisan, more pragmatic, and more independent Legislature. Let's see if Charlie and District 23 share that commitment in 2016.

Bonus "Did You Know?": One of the photos in Hoffman's home office shows a man riding down Main Street (I forgot to ask where) atop the backseat of a red convertible with a placard on the door reading "Hoffman for Governor."Charlie said that's his dad Leroy Hoffman, who ran against Bill Janklow in the GOP gubernatorial primary in 1978.

Leroy Hoffman also sang opera. He built the house in which Charlie and Holly have raised their family with a beautiful vaulted ceiling for his singing. In the 1960's Hoffman sang well enough to tour Europe professionally. Charlie lived in Europe with his dad for two years during that portion of Leroy's career.

But if you're looking for records, you have to search George Hoffman, not Leroy.

"What," I asked. "Leroy not operatic enough?"

"Yup," said Charlie.

31 comments

Facing a Republican Party committed to character assassination and a majority of voters who appear to tolerate it, the South Dakota Democratic Party has made the sensible tactical move of emphasizing initiative and referendum to win policy battles. Ballot issues are harder to personalize and thus harder to defeat by assassinating one candidate's character. Less distracted by personal attacks, voters can better see the good sense of the policy proposed.

That's why the SDDP's Initiated Measure 18 to raise the minimum wage may have a better chance of winning a majority vote than any Democratic candidate in the state. Raising the minimum wage has 61% support in South Dakota. IM18 has majority support in every age group and income group. It even wins 48% of South Dakota Republicans. The current $7.25 minimum has a third less purchasing power than the $1.60 minimum had in 1968. It will be hard for the Republicans to overcome that support that that glaring economic inequity by calling SDDP exec Zach Crago names.

In the policy-over-personal-attacks spirit of the initiative, I suppose I shouldn't try to support the minimum-wage increase by calling Governor Dennis Daugaard a hypocrite. But  Republican blogger John Tsitrian connects the dots to reveal an inconsistency in our Governor's policy thinking on the minimum wage and the gasoline tax.

Recall that Governor Daugaard opposes the minimum wage increase:

Gov. Dennis Daugaard, a Republican, also responded negatively to the proposal.

"This issue should be based on economics, not politics," Daugaard said in a statement. "There needs to be an analysis of how many jobs would be lost" [David Montgomery, "Dems Planning Initiated Measure to Raise Minimum Wage," Political Smokeout, 2013.07.17].

Economics provide a pretty good basis for raising the minimum wage. Governor Daugaard so far seems unconvinced. But he sounds like an economist when justifying his just-about-face on raising the gasoline tax:

“When I ran for governor four years ago, I promised that I would not support tax increases, and I have kept that promise. I want to participate in a discussion about future transportation needs, however, without taking any options off the table, including proposals to restore the purchasing power of the gas tax,” he said [Bob Mercer, "Daugaard: Willing to Consider Increasing State Highway Taxes," Aberdeen American News, 2014.05.21].

Governor Daugaard wants to restore his purchasing power for building and fixing roads. So why, asks Tsitrian, doesn't our good and gracious Governor want to restore the purchasing power of minimum-wage workers?

My beef about all this isn't the gas tax, per se. I'm just dismayed by the notion that cost-of-living increases need to be considered when pencilling in the price of government services but are to be ignored when it comes considering raises in the minimum wage. If Daugaard believes that jacking up gas taxes doesn't amount to a tax increase, just a restoration of buying power, then shouldn't that same principle be applied to minimum wages? Applying the Governor's own reasoning, raising minimum wages isn't the same as increasing them, it's just a matter of restoring their buying power. Yet Daugaard has effectively ignored this logic and withheld his support for the cost-of-living increase (with its built-in adjustment for inflation) that will appear on November's ballot.

It all looks to me like Daugaard believes state government should consider getting a cost-of-living increase but working people shouldn't. I don't like this. It's illogical. It's inconsistent—and it comes across as institutionalized cognitive dissonance [John Tsitrian, "Sure, Governor Daugaard...," The Constant Commoner, 2014.07.09].

Institutionalized cognitive dissonance—that's still a gentler attack than any of the personal slime Dick Wadhams will throw on behalf of South Dakota Republicans against Democratic candidates. Truer, too.

But Democrats don't need to go there. We don't need to campaign against Dennis Daugaard (or for any particular Democrat, for that matter) to convince a majority of voters to do what they already think is right: raise the minimum wage and index it to inflation so that even the lowest-paid workers can get a fair shake.

23 comments
Who needs highways when I've got a horse!

Who needs highways when I've got a horse!

What?! Kristi Noem still hasn't fixed the Highway Trust Fund? What do we pay our Congresswoman for?

While Kristi's colleagues fiddle with short-term stopgaps to fill our potholes, a new study funded by the Soybean Transportation Coalition suggests that a long-term fix may rely on some tax judo: ease drivers into a long-term gasoline-tax increase with an immediate tax break.

The federal gasoline tax has hung at 18.4 cents per gallon since 1993. Back then, that would have been about an 18% tax on gasoline. Today, 18.4 cents per $3.75 gallon is about 5%.

The soybean lobby suggests knocking a penny off the gasoline tax as a political palliative but then indexing the gasoline tax to inflation to keep up with the cost of concrete, steel, and everything else we need to build and maintain roads. Their study, conducted by the Indiana University School of Public and Environmental Affairs, says that inflation-indexing would make up for the lost revenue of the penny drop within four or five years. The study finds that South Dakota would take a $6.7-million hit in the first year, but we'd recoup the loss by 2019. By 2025, we'd accumulate $119 million in extra revenue ($25.9 million in 2025 alone) while paying 3.4 cents more per gallon.

Governor Daugaard will tell you that raising more money through the gasoline tax by indexing it to inflation is not a new tax or a tax increase; it's just restoring the purchasing power of the gas tax. Alas, the cut-then-index plan would extend the road budget bind for another couple years before road-building states would see any progress. Is additional fiscal pain (and rump pain, as you bounce over those potholes) really the only way we can coax Kristi and Congress into fixing the Highway Trust Fund?

74 comments

Recent Comments

  • caheidelberger on "Three Strikes: Round...": Rohr: two no-bid contracts: the first was the Janu...
  • lesliengland on "Three Strikes: Round...": they dont tell dad anything....
  • lesliengland on "Three Strikes: Round...": he's ken's (thune) bigger brother and barbie (noem...
  • Moses on "Three Strikes: Round...": His old buddy Dick thought this would be easy, and...
  • Roger Cornelius on "Three Strikes: Round...": Thank you hmr59. For those of us that are impat...
  • 96 Tears on "Three Strikes: Round...": This is the beginning of the end of Mike's politic...
  • hmr59 on "Three Strikes: Round...": Well said, Roger....
  • Roger Cornelius on "Three Strikes: Round...": By all means Mike Rounds, let's talk issues, the i...
  • daleb on "D.C. Super PAC Opens...": The next step in these ads has to make the case th...
  • Roger Cornelius on "Oglala Sioux Voters ...": Tim, This is the type of conversation that is nee...

Support Your Local Blogger!

  • Click the Tip Jar to send your donation to the Madville Times via PayPal, and support local alternative news and commentary!

Hot off the Press

Subscribe

Enter your email to subscribe to future updates

South Dakota Political Blogs

Greater SD Blogosphere

Visit These Sponsors

Conversation and Lunch with Democrats!
Join Stan Adelstein's conversation about South Dakota's past and future
Mike Myers, Independent Candidate for South Dakota Governor
Support Howard inventor John Albert

SD Mostly Political Blogroll

South Dakota Media

Madville Monthly

Meta