The GOED/EB-5/Benda scandal has connections to Northern Beef Packers, mega-dairies, Hutterites, Hyperion, the Philippines, and Mike Rounds. Now we add Keystone XL.

Jonathan Ellis fills our Easter baskets with the revelation that Rounds pals Joop Bollen and Richard Benda were scheming to connect their money-making EB-5 visa program to TransCanada's tar sands oil pipeline:

Joop Bollen, SDRC’s founder, applied to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services — which administers the federal EB-5 program — for permission to add TransCanada as a qualifying business under the program, which enables wealthy foreigners to get green cards for investing as little as $500,000 in qualifying projects.

Besides trying to help Trans-Canada, the same application asked to dramatically expand SDRC’s geographic area of coverage. Bollen sought federal permission to expand SDRC to Montana and Nebraska in a bid to provide financing to the Keystone XL pipeline from the Canadian border to Nebraska’s southern border. SDRC’s contract with South Dakota to run the EB-5 program was supposed to be “for the benefit of South Dakota,” according to the contract’s language [Jonathan Ellis, "Documents Link State-Sponsored Company, Keystone XL," that Sioux Falls paper, 2014.04.19].

Bollen applied to include Keystone XL in May 2011. Governor Dennis Daugaard knew nothing about it... which is what we would expect when Mike Rounds let his pals take the EB-5 program private and hide their work from public oversight.

The EB-5–Keystone XL connection makes perfect sense. Recruit Chinese investors to pour money into a pipeline that will bring North American oil to their homeland. Send a 10% commission to Bollen, Benda, and other friends of Rounds and Daugaard, who cheerlead the pipeline and do nothing to block TransCanada's eminent-domain predations on South Dakota landowners.

Ellis reports the cost of Keystone XL in South Dakota alone may be $920 million. That would have allowed Bollen and Benda to recruit up to 1,840 EB-5 investors at $500,000 a pop. Recruiting investors for a huge industrial project that's received oodles of global press and is guaranteed to make money would have been much easier than selling the merits of some local beef plant or a Deadwood casino that no one outside South Dakota has ever heard of. And those investors would have paid Bollen, Benda, and SDRC's lawyers $45,000 each, for a possible take of $82.8 million.

TransCanada, to their credit, said no thanks. As with Hyperion, Bollen and Benda just couldn't strike oil with their visa investment scheme. But the EB-5 story keeps on growing. Stay tuned.